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The First Order:

The first order is political in nature. It has been called the Levitical priesthood. Even though, it would be more appropriate to call it the Davidical priesthood. This is because the tribe of Judah was given the blessing to have access to this. This Davitical priesthood is an appendage to the Levitical priesthood. This is because all priesthood orders are appendages of those orders above them.

The Testament Of Naphtali:
CHAPTER 5
1 For in the fortieth year of my life, I saw a vision on the Mount of Olives, on the east of Jerusalem, that the sun and the moon were standing still. 2 And behold Isaac, the father of my father, said to us: Run and lay hold of them, each one according to his strength; and to him that seizeth them will the sun and moon belong. 3 And we all of us ran together, and Levi laid hold of the sun, and Judah outstripped the others and seized the moon, and they were both of them lifted up with them. 4 And when Levi became as a sun, lo, a certain young man gave to him twelve branches of palm; and Judah was bright as the moon, and under their feet were twelve rays.
CHAPTER 8
1 And lo! my children, I have shown unto you the last times, how everything shall come to pass in Israel. 2 Do ye also, therefore, charge your children that they be united to Levi and to Judah; For through them shall salvation arise unto Israel, And in them shall Jacob be blessed. 3 For through their tribes shall God appear dwelling among men on earth, To save the race of Israel, And to gather together the righteous from amongst the Gentiles.

THE TESTAMENT OF JUDAH
34 And Isaac, the father of my father, blessed me to be king in Israel, and Jacob further blessed me in like manner.
35 And I know that from me shall the kingdom be established.

The tribe of Judah is said to take the lead in the political kingdom. And when fully established it will have seven offices and quarms or orders.
The Assyrians were referred to in Micah and they were a political power. And political power has to do with the first order of priesthood and the tribe of Judah and offices have to do with the descendants of Jesse and King David.


The first is a political order with seven steps or offices and quarms.

Micah 5:5
And this man shall be the peace, when the Assyrian shall come into our land: and when he shall tread in our palaces, then shall we raise against him seven shepherds, and eight principal men.
-------------------
The eight is best explained in the Law Of One:
http://www.lawofone.info/results.php?s=16
Ra: I am Ra. The term density is a, what you call, mathematical one. The closest analogy is that of music, whereby after seven notes on your western type of scale, if you will, the eighth note begins a new octave. Within your great octave of existence which we share with you, there are seven octaves or densities. Within each density there are seven sub-densities. Within each sub-density, are seven sub-sub-densities. Within each sub-sub-density, seven sub-sub-sub-densities and so on infinitely.

The 5th Step

This has to do with the Telestial order.   The 5th step in the 1st priesthood order called the Levitical is named after king David. For those who don't know, in old times this meant the civil law based on the ten commandments and the law of Moses.
Malachi Chapter 4
4 Remember ye the law of Moses my servant, which I commanded unto him in Horeb for all Israel, with the statutes and judgments.

Life and Teachings vol. 4  page 39
11. The ten commandments are not the objectified law of God at all. In them Moses tried to lay down a law for mental and moral conduct but there is no such conduct outside the law of the Spirit and the consciousness of the activity of Spirit must be discerned as the only governing law. The statement, “As you stand one with Law, you will not” do these things, was the original intent, but has been translated, “Thou shalt not.” If you are within the law of harmony you will not produce discords but to merely refrain from producing discords does not place you within the law of harmony. To refrain from discord merely involves doing nothing at all and surely this never would produce a musician nor would it express harmony. The active doing of the law produces effects commensurate with the law. Life is active, dynamic and not static. It is DOING TRUTH, not merely refraining from that which is not truth. 12. If you are in obedience to the Law itself you will automatically refrain from doing certain things which are not included in the natural operations of the law. You do not do these things if you follow the law, but in omitting these things you may not fulfill the law at all but only obey your own notions. “Thou shalt not,” was the Mosaic law as Moses gave it out. These were the emanations of the Sephiroth or the Tree of Life. He veiled that fact and objectified it for the people but gave the Priests the real meaning in the Talmud.


This law of Moses is the civil law and is referred to as gospel of the kingdom. This is part of the ensign to come forth from the remnant and from some native Americans.  I mention James Strang below because he was of the Davidical lineage and was a person who held this office of King David. It should be noted that his jurisdiction was that of a small group of people whom he represented. As is shown in many of the people called to lead in priesthood capacities, misunderstanding and abuse seems to be a prevalent problem for the people during those times. So we should keep in mind that this man was less than perfect and while his intentions were good at some point, he also became abusive and implemented some less than honorable rulings. He also revealed some portions of the law of Moses which were removed from the original old testimant books handed down to us from the Jews. He was able to do this by translating some portions of the original plates of Labon. For those who don't know this, this is explained in the Book Of Mormon. It was told how these records were of the original Jewish records as passed down through the leaders of the tribe of Joseph. It is of interest how these records shed light on the way the political kingdom was established in those early days of the Israelites. It of interest to us in these times who are interested in setting up a political system to govern ourselves in these latter days. I am going to attempt to explain, teach/learn about the proper way to set up such system for a self governing free people.  The Nemenhah people of the Mentinah Archives were the ones we are to look for guidance regarding this. They were the prototype of a free people and are to be an ensign to us. They appointed their own leaders by general consensus and approved or disapproved of the laws and system of governance suggested by their leaders. They also had power to remove and replace such leaders as they disapproved of. In all cases the will of the people is sovereign.  It is important to realize that the law of Moses is a moral code. It was given to a specific people at a specific time. All people have their own moral code. Not any one person is alike in their level of progression and vibratory level so to speak. The moral code will vary according to the above mentioned vibratory and levels of progression of the person or peoples in question.  There is a saying that what is good for one person may not be good for others. Or what is medicine for one may be poison to another.  A big mistake made by well meaning people is to impose what they perceive as an appropriate moral code on society at large resulting in an interference of people's free will and freedom of choice.  Each people or person needs to have their own moral code as applies to them in their particular situation. This moral code doesn't have to be from any particular brand of religion or thought. So the law of Moses is a particular brand so to speak for the Israelite people from a distant time. The Nemenah people of the Mentinah Archives have explained how in their time the law was interpreted and established by the general consensus of the people. The people had the right and obligation to remove such leaders as did not represent their interests or their level of progression or vibratory rate so to speak. It was thought that the free will of the people was the most important aspect. They recognized the fact that when the people as a whole chose that which is destructive, at some point these people will self destruct so to speak. But to them this is preferable to taking away the free will of the people by forcing a moral code on a people not representative of them. Some laws are universal and as truth stands alone and is evident in itself. Other civilizations may articulate and organize natural laws differently and may have different applications of the same. Below is an interesting perspective offered in The Law of One. The following quote is of particular interest: "only to point out the inevitable consequences of codification of response which does not recognize the uniqueness of each and every situation within your experience."
The Law of One Session 83
83.12 Questioner: Then you say that there are no cases where those who are service-to-others oriented are using in any way techniques of enslavement that have grown as a result of the evolution of our social structures? Is this what you mean?
Ra: I am Ra. It was our understanding that your query concerned conditions before the veiling. There was no unconscious slavery, as you call this condition, at that period. At the present space/time the condition of well-meant and unintentional slavery are so numerous that it beggars our ability to enumerate them.
83.13 Questioner: Then for a service-to-others oriented entity at this time meditation upon the nature of these little-expected forms of slavery might be productive in polarization I would think. Am I correct?
Ra: I am Ra. You are quite correct.
83.14 Questioner: I would say that a very high percentage of the laws and restrictions within what we call our legal system are of a nature of enslavement of which I just spoke. Would you agree with this?
Ra: I am Ra. It is a necessary balance to the intention of law, which is to protect, that the result would encompass an equal distortion towards imprisonment. Therefore, we may say that your supposition is correct. This is not to denigrate those who, in green- and blue-ray energies, sought to free a peaceable people from the bonds of chaos but only to point out the inevitable consequences of codification of response which does not recognize the uniqueness of each and every situation within your experience.

Another method to counter the attempts of secret societies to enslave the people was to have the female mothers elect or nominate and have the people elect these nominee through general consensus.
The Mentinah Archives Volume One thru Nine (As of Jan. 12, 2011)
Page 22 
"But our teachers, yea, and all the people together, strove diligently against this vice, and our system whereby we governed ourselves was of such a kind as to defeat those who attempted to rise up in stature and to subdue and enslave the poor."

"Wherefore, we chose and designated our wives as those who would elect the judges and that no action would be decided by one judge but by a council of judges. In this way, if the judges become unjust, it is only because the whole people have fallen into wickedness. For, our wives have always been more meek and more naturally prone to righteousness than our men.:"

Below is an account in Jesus's time describing the corruption of the Jewish law, customs and rabbis of the time by Dolores Cannon - They Walked with Jesus
D: You mean they were judgmental?
A: Very judgmental, and strict. And without cause.
D: Was this the priests or the rabbis?
A: Yes, the rabbis. There was only one way for everything. And it was unfair and unkind in many cases. The rabbis let their position and power distort their decision-making at times. They were the ones you go to to solve disputes and problems. And they felt that they became God, instead of listening to God and trying to be fair.
D: Power can sometimes do that to people.
A: Yes. So instead of trying to be of service and help dissolve the problems, they tend to create more, at times.
D: So they are trying to go strictly by the Law, without having any mercy or any other interpretations? And this made Jesus angry or what?
A: It made him very disappointed. He realized that what he was hearing in the Temple or through the rabbis was not
what he felt God wished. He did not feel they were living the Commandments. He would question what they said, and ask why it could not be this way. And they were not used to being questioned.
D: They were used to having their word as law.
A: Right. And he would come up with a solution that would solve the problem quite well, showing justice and mercy and equality. And there were ways for the people who were the wrongdoers to make amends. So he would come up with solutions and challenge theirs, and this created many problems. I think it angered the rabbis because the Nazarene had more clarity and more fairness in his solutions. But Jesus could not deal with the hypocrisy and cruelty, because it is not God that is unloving and unmerciful, it is man. So he felt that his Temple was now the land, the earth was the floor, the sky was the ceiling. He would spread God's Laws and try to be a teacher.

Page 103
During the time of Jesus the Jews lived strictly by the Law, the Torah, or the Laws of Moses found in the first books of the Old Testament. These rules governed everything in their life, and was a point of dispute between the priests and Jesus. He had been taught to interpret the Law differently and more fairly while he studied with the Essenes. He thought that in the priests’ strictness they had forgotten the individual and that circumstances may influence how these rules could be applied.



The Revelations of James Strang
http://www.strangite.org/Reveal.htm

SECTION 12

A Revelation and Vision of the Indian Mission, given on 8-25-1846.

1. I, James J. Strang, was at Elizabeth, on the Monongahela River, on the twenty-fifth day of August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, and had a vision; and lo, I beheld a land amidst wide waters, and covered with large timber, with a deep broad bay on one side of it. And I wandered over it upon little hills and among rich valleys, where the air was pure and serene, and the unfading foliage, with its fragrant shades, attracted me till I wandered to bright clear waters, scarcely ruffled by the breeze. And Indians in canoes glided about, and caught fish, and sat down to eat; and they gathered in assemblies, and were taught words of truth and ways of holiness, and they hearkened. And I beheld many wonders there.

2. And one came near unto me, and I said, What meaneth this? And he answered and said, Behold, here shall God establish his people, even the sons of Joseph, on an everlasting foundation; and from hence shall the gospel of the kingdom go unto the tribes, and they shall not any more be despised, for the nations that set the foot upon their necks will be cut off that they be no more a people. Behold, he hath already begun it. The sword is already bathed in blood, which spareth not their destroyers. And blood shall not cease till their most haughty oppressor is laid low to rise no more.

3. And he hath chosen this nation to begin vengeance for them. And if this people will turn unto him, and repent of all their evil deeds, and no more slay the prophets which he sendeth unto them, but will hearken unto them to do the things which they shall speak unto them, and keep the words of the Lord, and his commandments to do them, then will he exalt the nation and establish it, for he hath raised it up by the hands of wise men, whom he set up for that very purpose, to be the instrument of his purpose in the last days.

4. And upon this land where thou standest shall the gospel of the kingdom be established among the Lamanites, and from thence shall it go forth to their tribes. And blessing and honor and great glory shall be on those that teach them, for he will make their arm strong, and their bow shall abide in strength, and they shall not bow to the oppressor; and the power of the Gentile shall not be on them, for the arm of God shall be with them to support.

5. And here shall the Lamanites come to learn the law of the Lord their God, who hath preserved them, that they be not utterly destroyed. And other barbarians shall come also, and shall learn ways of holiness; for the Lord their God shall teach them, and his people shall instruct them, and shall go forth as ministers of truth unto all people.serene, and the unfading foliage, with its fragrant shades, attracted me till I wandered to bright clear waters, scarcely ruffled by the breeze. And Indians in canoes glided about, and caught fish, and sat down to eat; and they gathered in assemblies, and were taught words of truth and ways of holiness, and they hearkened. And I beheld many wonders there.

2. And one came near unto me, and I said, What meaneth this? And he answered and said, Behold, here shall God establish his people, even the sons of Joseph, on an everlasting foundation; and from hence shall the gospel of the kingdom go unto the tribes, and they shall not any more be despised, for the nations that set the foot upon their necks will be cut off that they be no more a people. Behold, he hath already begun it. The sword is already bathed in blood, which spareth not their destroyers. And blood shall not cease till their most haughty oppressor is laid low to rise no more.

3. And he hath chosen this nation to begin vengeance for them. And if this people will turn unto him, and repent of all their evil deeds, and no more slay the prophets which he sendeth unto them, but will hearken unto them to do the things which they shall speak unto them, and keep the words of the Lord, and his commandments to do them, then will he exalt the nation and establish it, for he hath raised it up by the hands of wise men, whom he set up for that very purpose, to be the instrument of his purpose in the last days.

4. And upon this land where thou standest shall the gospel of thOklahoma 73020e kingdom be established among the Lamanites, and from thence shall it go forth to their tribes. And blessing and honor and great glory shall be on those that teach them, for he will make their arm strong, and their bow shall abide in strength, and they shall not bow to the oppressor; and the power of the Gentile shall not be on them, for the arm of God shall be with them to support.

5. And here shall the Lamanites come to learn the law of the Lord their God, who hath preserved them, that they be not utterly destroyed. And other barbarians shall come also, and shall learn ways of holiness; for the Lord their God shall teach them, and his people shall instruct them, and shall go forth as ministers of truth unto all people.


He hath chosen his servant James to be King: he hath made him his Apostle to all nations: he hath established him a Prophet, above the Kings of the earth; and appointed him King in Zion: by his own voice did he call him, and he sent his Angels unto him to ordain him. (The Book of the Law of the Lord  CHAPTER 20:6)

http://www.strangite.org/Reveal.htm

SECTION 4

The Ordination of James Strang, administered on 6-27-1844.

1. On the twenty-seventh day of June, 1844, at five and a half o'clock in the afternoon, James J. Strang was in the Spirit, and the Angel of God came unto him and saluted him, saying,

2. Fear God and be strengthened and obey him, for great is the work which he hath required at thy hand. Go on in hope and strength, and falter not, and he will sustain thee, and thou shalt triumph, for the voice of the Lord by the mouth of Joseph will he fulfill.

3. And the Angel of the Lord stretched forth his hand unto him and touched his head, and put oil upon him and said, Grace is poured upon thy lips, and God blesseth thee with the greatness of the Everlasting Priesthood. He putteth might and glory and majesty upon thee, and in meekness and truth and righteousness will he prosper thee.

4. Thou shalt save his people from their enemies when there is no arm to deliver, and shalt bring salvation when destruction walketh in the house of thy God. Thou hast loved righteousness and hated iniquity; therefore thy God hath anointed thee with oil and set thee above all thy fellows.

5. Thy words shall be like sharp arrows in the heart of the wicked. Thou shalt rebuke those who pervert the word of thy God. Thou shalt preach righteousness and the sublime mysteries in the ears of many people, and shall bring the gospel to many who have not known it and to the nations afar off.

6. Thou shalt drive backward and put to shame those that do evil, and the workers of iniquity shall fall. They shall be cast down and shall not be able to rise. With purity will the Lord thy God arm thee, and purity and truth shalt thou teach.

7. Keep the law of the Lord thy God in thy heart, and none of thy steps shall slide. With thee is the fountain of truth. In thy light shall the people of thy God see, for thou shalt speak his word unto them, and from thy lips shall they receive it.

8. The blessing of their God shalt thou put upon them, and his curse upon evil doers, if, after being oft rebuked, they repent not; and before my people shalt thou go to lead them into my ways, for unto thee has the Lord thy God given salvation.

9. In righteousness shalt thou rule. Thou shalt reOklahoma 73020deem the poor and the needy from suffering and violence, and to thee God giveth judgment for them. Thou shalt deliver the prey from the spoiler, for God, thy God, hath put them in thy hand.

10. And in weakness will he make thee strong. Thou shalt rule among his people. Thou shalt break in pieces the rod of the oppressor and the yoke of the unjust ruler. They shall flee away, but the way of peace shall they not find.

11. While the day of the wicked abideth, shalt thou prepare a refuge for the oppressed and for the poor and needy. Unto thee shall they come, and their brethren who are scattered shall come with them, and the destruction of the ungodly shall quickly follow, for it already worketh. Go thy way and be strong.

Excerpts from The Book of the Law of the Lord 

http://www.strangite.org/Law.htm

CHAPTER 20

CALLING OF A KING

1. The Lord your God hath made the earth and established it, and unto him the dominion thereof belongeth. He created man, and gave him dominion over it. The nations are the workmanship of his hands; and he hath the right to rule. (42, 179)

2. He appointed Kings, and Rulers, and Judges; but man rebelled against them. He made laws, but man broke them, and trampled on them, and forgot them. (26, 114)

3. Unto Noah gave he dominion over the earth: and to Shem after him; but the people rebelled against him, and established their own ways; and those that oppressed them were their Kings, and ruled over them in unrighteousness. (38, 179)

4. Moses was King in Israel; but the people kept not the Law of God; and, rebelling, set up a false god, and worshipped it. When God would make them Kings to rule the earth, they despised his majesty, and went after other gods. (43, 173)

5. Men have everywhere rebelled against God: nevertheless, the earth is his, and the fulness thereof. The dominion of it belongeth to him, and he conferreth it upon whomsoever he will. (30, 146)

6. He hath chosen his servant James to be King: he hath made him his Apostle to all nations: he hath established him a Prophet, above the Kings of the earth; and appointed him King in Zion: by his own voice did he call him, and he sent his Angels unto him to ordain him. (54, 207)

7. And the Angel of the Lord stretched forth his hand unto him, and touched his head, and put oil upon him, and said, Grace is poured upon thy lips, and God blesseth thee with the greatness of the everlasting Priesthood. He putteth might, and glory, and majesty upon thee; and in meekness, and truth, and righteousness, will he prosper thee. (60, 266)

8. Thou shalt save his people from their enemies, when there is no arm to deliver; and shalt bring salvation, when destruction walketh in the house of thy God. Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity: therefore thy God hath anointed thee with oil, and set thee above all thy fellows. (50, 233)

9. Thy words shall be like sharp arrows in the heart of the wicked. Thou shalt rebuke those who pervert the word of thy God. Thou shalt preach righteousness and the sublime mysteries in the ears of many people; and shall bring the gospel to many who have not known it, and to the nations afar off. (56, 234)

10. Thou shalt drive backward and put to shame those that do evil; and the workers of iniquity shall fall. They shall be cast down, and shall not be able to rise. With purity will the Lord thy God arm thee, and purity and truth shalt thou teach. (47, 189)

11. Keep the Law of the Lord thy God in thy heart; and none of thy steps shall slide. With thee is the fountain of truth. In thy light shall the people of thy God see; for thou shalt speak his words unto them, and from thy lips shall they receive it. (51, 190)

12. The blessing of their God shalt thou put upon them, and his curse upon evil doers, if, after being oft rebuked, they repent not: and before my people shalt thou go, to lead them into my ways; for unto thee has the Lord thy God given salvation. (47, 189)

13. In righteousness shalt thou rule: thou shalt redeem the poor and the needy from suffering and violence; and to thee God giveth judgment for them. Thou shalt deliver the prey from the spoiler; for God, thy God, hath put them in thy hand. (43, 187)

14. And in weakness will he make thee strong. Thou shalt rule among his people. Thou shalt break in pieces the rod of the oppressor, and the yoke of the unjust ruler. They shall flee away, but the way of peace shall they not find. (44, 177)

15. While the day of the wicked abideth, shalt thou prepare a refuge for the oppressed, and for the poor and needy. Unto thee shall they come, and their brethren who are scattered shall come with them; and the destruction of the ungodly shall quickly follow; for it already worketh. Go thy way, and be strong. (55, 242)

(15 sections, 686 words, 2905 letters)



CHAPTER 21

DUTY OF THE KING

1. The King, when he sitteth upon the throne of his Kingdom and ruleth, shall write for him a copy of the Book of the Law, according to that which is before the Lord continually; and it shall be with him, and he shall read therein all the days of his life; that the fear of the Lord his God be continually before him, and that he remember the Law, and forget not to administer justice and judgment throughout the earth; and that he turn not aside from the Commandment one way or the other; to the end that he prolong his days in the Kingdom, and of his children among the faithful. (112, 455)

2. He shall execute judgment among the people, and over the Princes and Rulers, and over all that sit in judgment: he shall deliver the poor, the needy, and the oppressed: and if their cry be faint, yet shall he hear; he shall be a father to the fatherless, and a husband to the widow, and a guardian to him who hath no protector. (63, 254)

3. He shall overthrow the rebellious, destroy traitors, and punish those that do wickedly. The haughty shall he make low, and the oppressor shall he tread down: those that exalt themselves, shall he abase. (33, 163)

4. The power of the Lord God, he giveth to him, to rule the nations, and to execute judgments among the children of men: he shall declare the Laws and Commandments; exercise his dominion; and cast a shield round about the children of his people; that his dominion be not taken from him forever. (53, 231)

(4 sections, 261 words, 1103 letters)



CHAPTER 22

ABSTINENCE OF THE KING

1. He shall not multiply to himself horses: he shall not multiply to himself carriages: he shall not multiply to himself ships: he shall not multiply to himself armour: he shall have all these to defend his people, and the children of his people, but not to oppress them. (48, 214)

2. He shall not multiply to himself wives; lest he forget the Law, and avenge not his people: and lest his heart turn from them to strange women. (27, 112)

3. He shall not multiply to himself servants of the children of his people; lest his yoke be oppressive. (18, 82)

4. He shall not multiply to himself silver and gold; lest he be proud, and turn away from this Law, and do it not. (23, 85)

5. Neither shall he lead his people to strange places to dwell therein, which the Lord thy God hath not appointed for their dwelling; lest they depart from the Law, and despise it. (32, 142)

6. He shall not make other Laws, despising this; but all his Laws and Commandments shall be according to the Law of the Lord thy God, to establish it. For the Lord thy God shall speak. He shall decree, and he shall alter it as seemeth good unto him, and none shall hinder. (52, 210)

(6 sections, 200 words, 845 letters)



CHAPTER 23

VICEROYS

1. The King, when he committeth the administration of his Kingdom to another; or when he appointeth another to rule a portion in his name, may make him a Viceroy, and confer upon him Kingly dignity. (35, 156)

2. The Viceroy shall keep the King's Commandment, and shall not depart from it; he shall not exalt himself against the King: he shall keep none of his doings from the King; and he shall be faithful unto him, and to his house, in all things. (45, 185)

3. The Viceroy shall make no Laws: he shall govern according to the Law of the King, and the Law of God: if he deviseth a new Law, yet shall he not proclaim it, but by the King's Commandment. (38, 144)

4. He shall not do that which is forbidden to the King; but he shall exercise prerogative by the King's commission, in whatsoever part of his dominion he shall appoint him: he shall not despise the King's Commandment, nor do that which he disalloweth; lest he be a usurper, and be removed from his place. (54, 239)

(4 sections, 172 words, 724 letters)



CHAPTER 24

KING'S COUNCIL

1. The King shall be aided by a Council, to consist of wise men, chosen from among his people, learned in the Law of the Lord, and faithful unto the King; who shall assemble before him in council, as often as he shall require, to give him advice in whatsoever matter he shall ask them. (54, 221)

2. The King may apportion the administration of the Laws, and of the affairs of his Kingdom among them, giving to each his appropriate department, as the King shall command. (29, 138)

3. The members of the King's Council shall dwell near the King; they shall attend him on his journeyings, if he require it: they shall each give him information, reason, counsel and advice, of whatsoever matter he shall require, and shall keep nothing back. (43, 203)

4. Each member of the Council shall keep the charge of the King, which he committeth to him, in his several department; shall be a faithful Steward of the King's substance, in his hands: and shall render the same, with a just account of his stewardship, as often as the King requires. (51, 222)

5. The Counsellors of the King shall be chosen by him as seemeth him good, being just men, learned in the Law, not proud, nor haughty; not given to much babbling; and they shall keep the King's secret all the days of their lives. (43, 176)

6. If they serve the King well, he shall reward them as just and faithful Stewards. If they are unfaithful, he shall frown upon them. But he may choose new Counsellors, when it seemeth him good. (35, 151)

(6 sections, 255 words, 1111 letters)



CHAPTER 25

KING'S COURT

1. The King shall appoint wise men, learned in the Law of God, lovers of righteousness, not fearing the rich, nor despising the poor, to be Judges; who shall sit before him continually, to judge all great causes. They shall sit upon the King's judgmentseat, at his gate: the ear of the Judges shall never be closed, that they cannot hear. This is the King's Court. (65, 282)

2. The King shall appoint twelve Judges to this Court, if so many are needed; all of them High Priests unto the Most High God; for the judging of all great matters; but all the smaller matters may be judged by other Judges, as the King shall appoint, that these may judge the larger causes continually, and that they judge upon the judgment of other Judges. (65, 282)

3. And the King shall order and determine what causes shall come before the King's Court, upon his judgmentseat to be judged, and what causes shall be judged before the other judgmentseats. (31, 152)

4. And the Judges shall hear and judge, and determine speedily: they shall not delay: and they shall judge righteous judgment, and shall not take reward, and do injustice. (28, 135)

5. And if they judge unrighteously, or refuse judgment to the just, or despise the Law, or take reward for judgment, the King shall remove them. When they have served faithfully, he shall relieve them in their age and infirmity. (39, 180)

6. The Deacons shall bring the disobedient, the stiffnecked, the peacebreakers, and all who have done great wickedness, before the Judges, and shall execute their judgment on all who withstand it, and obey not. (33, 168)

7. The Deacons shall execute all the orders of the Court, and shall be a fear unto the disorderly, and all revilers. They shall do whatsoever the Judges command. (28, 127)

8. The Chief Deacon shall be the Steward of the King's substance, which he committeth to the Judges, and shall render a just account of his stewardship to the King. (29, 129)

(8 sections, 318 words, 1455 letters)



CHAPTER 26

CITY COURT

1. The King shall appoint Judges in all the cities, three to a city, and more if the business of judgment require it: all of them Elders of the people; Priests of God; who shall sit upon the judgmentseat of the city, and judge all the causes which shall come before them; even all such as the King shall appoint unto them to judge. (63, 258)

2. They shall sit in judgment, on the judgmentseat in the Synagogue of their city, every Sabbath day, to do justice unto all men; and shall render speedy judgment upon all who have violated the Laws. (35, 157)

3. The Deacons shall execute their judgment upon all who obey not, and shall bring before them the peacebreakers, and all who do violence. (23, 110)

4. The Chief Deacon of the city shall be Steward of the King's substance, which he committeth to the Judges, and shall render a just account. He shall also be the principal Minister of the Court. (35, 153)

(4 sections, 156 words, 678 letters)



CHAPTER 27

MUNICIPALITIES

1. In every village an Elder shall be appointed to rule, to teach, and to instruct: he shall govern the village according to the Law, and the King's Commandment: to him shall the Priests of the Synagogue give heed; and if there be other Elders, they also shall give heed to him. (51, 216)

2. In every town shall Elders be appointed to rule, and teach, and instruct: five to a town: but if there be more than five Synagogues in the town, yet shall there be an Elder to each Synagogue, of whom one shall be Chief. (43, 170)

3. They shall govern the town according to the Law, and the King's Commandment: they shall instruct the people in the Synagogue, every one in his order: unto the Chief of them shall the Priests of that town give heed; and unto every one, in the Synagogue where he administers. (49, 217)

4. In every city shall Elders be appointed to rule, to teach, and to instruct, in all the Synagogues: but to the Synagogue of the judgmentseat of the city, shall three be appointed Judges of the Court of the city: another shall be appointed who shall be Bishop of that city; he shall be Chief of the Elders, both in that city, and in the towns and villages in its vicinity: to him shall they all give heed. (77, 316)

5. If there be more than one city in the province, then shall that bishop who is appointed to rule the province, administer in the chief city: he shall be an Archbishop: to him shall the other Bishops give heed. (39, 165)

6. But if there be no city in a province, yet shall an Elder be appointed to rule in that province: he shall be Bishop: and a Court shall be appointed also, and three Elders to be Judges: they shall be appointed at that place where the King will establish his government for that province. (54, 227)

7. By these shall the provinces, and cities, and towns, and villages of the Kingdom be governed: and officers shall be appointed to assist them in governing, as shall be necessary. The King shall establish his dominion in this order forever. (40, 192)

(7 sections, 353 words, 1503 letters)



CHAPTER 28

TWELVE APOSTLES

1. When the Lord your God shall send the gospel to the nations, he shall call and choose twelve Apostles, to be the witnesses of his name and Kingdom, unto every nation, kindred, tongue, and people. (35, 154)

2. He shall appoint them Shepherds of the flock; under the direction of the Chief Shepherd: he shall make them Princes in his Kingdom: he shall appoint them to declare his Law unto all nations; and to execute it among the Saints who are scattered abroad. (45, 202)

3. The Apostles, every one, shall have jurisdiction of the Churches beyond the Kingdom, by appointment of the Chief Shepherd: they shall exercise royal authority in the Kingdom, by the King's Commandment. (31, 164)

4. Let them bear a faithful testimony to the nations: let them not shun to declare the whole counsel of God; and he shall give them rest from their labours; they shall be Princes forever. (34, 147)

5. One among them shall be Chief: to him shall they all give heed, as to a King among Princes: yet shall the Chief Shepherd be King over them all: they shall not rebel against his Commandment; and they shall be Princes in his Kingdom forever. (45, 189)

(5 sections, 190 words, 856 letters)



CHAPTER 29

HIGH PRIESTS

1. The Lord your God will choose faithful men, keepers of his Law, examples in righteousness, to be Priests of the order of an endless life. They shall be Princes and Nobles, and High Priests in the Kingdom of God. The presiding and ruling power is the prerogative of this Priesthood. (50, 225)

2. From the High Priests shall the King select Counsellors, and Judges, and Rulers. They shall sanctify things appointed of God to holy purposes, and shall minister in the salvation of the living and the dead. (35, 167)

3. One hundred and fortyfour High Priests form a quorum. From among themselves shall they choose one to preside in all their deliberations, and two to assist in presiding; but the King whom God shall set up, shall preside over all the High Priests. (43, 198)

(3 sections, 128 words, 590 letters)



CHAPTER 30

SEVENTIES

1. The twelve Apostles shall select seventy Elders, chosen men, faithful in the ministry of the word, to preach the gospel, under their direction, unto all people. (26, 129)

2. One of the Seventy shall they appoint Chief: he shall be first in their assembly, and shall set them in order. (21, 87)

3. Other Seventies may the Apostles choose, until there shall be seven Seventies; and one shall be appointed Chief of each Seventy, to set his fellows in order, and to be first in their assembly. (34, 154)

4. The Seventies shall labour in the ministry of the word, and of sacraments and ordinances, onefourth of their time; and continually, if their households do not lack bread and raiment. (30, 148)

5. They shall have jurisdiction by appointment of the Apostles; and shall be Chief in the Churches they build up. (19, 90)

6. When they have laboured faithfully, they shall have rest, and a goodly inheritance among the just; but if they come short in the ministry whereunto they are called, their power shall be taken from them. (35, 163)

7. The Chief of the Apostles shall be the Prince and Grand Master of the Seventies: unto him shall they all give heed. (22, 92)

(7 sections, 187 words, 863 letters)



CHAPTER 31

ELDERS

1. The wise men in every city, who love righteousness, and hate iniquity; who seek unto the Law of God and its justice; who obey the King, and honour all who are placed in authority, shall be ordained Elders. (38, 161)

2. These shall be Judges and Rulers, and shall govern and instruct in their several callings, as they shall be appointed: they are the leaders of the people. (27, 124)

3. The Elders shall read this Law all the days of their lives, that they may instruct the people therein, to keep it; and that they may be able to serve the King as Governours, and Rulers, and Judges, and Commissioners, and Masters of the King's business, in the several offices to which he shall appoint them. (56, 242)

4. When they go beyond the Kingdom to minister in word, and sacraments, and ordinances, the Apostles shall rule over them. (20, 96)

5. But they shall give heed to the Chief among them in their several cities, and one of the King's Counsellors shall be the Grand Master of them all. (28, 116)

6. The Elders shall instruct the people in the Law and the gospel on the Sabbath day, and in their assemblies: they shall visit the sick, the poor, and the needy: they shall comfort mourners, and all who are distressed, and counsel those who know not right. (46, 201)

(6 sections, 215 words, 940 letters)



CHAPTER 32

PRIESTS

1. Faithful servants of God; godly in their walk and conversation; not given to strong drink, nor lust, nor lasciviousness; shall be ordained Priests, in all the cities, and in every town and village which hath a Synagogue. (37, 176)

2. They shall be Keepers and Ministers of the Temples and Synagogues, and shall be Ministers and Singers, and shall serve in all callings in the worship of God; and in all the ceremonies which shall be appointed for worship and adoration. (41, 191)

3. The Priests shall also assist the Elders in the work of preaching, and shall visit from house to house to teach godliness among the people, and shall baptize for the remission of sins. (33, 149)

4. Whenever the Lord your God shall command you to build a Temple unto him, that he may come and dwell in the midst of you, then will he establish a peculiar Priesthood, to administer the ordinances of that Temple. (39, 169)

5. One of the Priests in every Temple shall be Chief, and to him all shall give heed. But in every Synagogue the Priests shall give heed to the Chief of the Elders. (32, 127)

6. One of the King's Counsellors shall be Grand Master of all the Priests. (13, 57)

7. Godly women shall be Singers and Musicians, and assistants in the ceremonies, but they shall not kill sacrifices. (18, 93)

(7 sections, 213 words, 962 letters)



CHAPTER 33

TEACHERS

1. In every city, town, and village, ye shall ordain Teachers, men and women who are apt to teach, learned in letters, and in every science, and every manner of wisdom and knowledge; that they may instruct you and your children, and that you may attain to all wisdom and all knowledge. (51, 222)

2. In every Synagogue shall Teachers be appointed to instruct the people on the Sabbath day in the ways of the Lord, and in the words of this Law. The children of the rich and the poor, shall come together to learn of them, without price. (45, 186)

3. One of the King's Counsellors shall be the Grand Master of all the Teachers: he shall be Chief in their assemblies, and shall set them in order; to him shall they all give heed. (34, 139)

4. The Teachers of eminence shall be set apart as Doctors: but if any have attained to very great eminence, they shall be Rabbis, and the most eminent of all shall be Rabbonis. (32, 138)

5. Ye shall establish schools in all your cities, towns and villages; to every one shall a Teacher be appointed; but to the large schools many, that they may be able to faithfully instruct all who come unto them. (38, 167)

6. In every city shall ye establish an Academy: a learned Doctor shall be the Chief Teacher therein. (17, 79)

7. In every city shall a College be established: a learned Rabbi shall be Chief Teacher, and he shall have Doctors for his assistants. (23, 106)

8. If the city be very large, then may you establish other Colleges; and in all the cities, and large towns may you establish other Academies; and the Chief Teacher where there are several Academies, shall be a Rabbi; and where there are several Colleges, shall be a Rabboni. (48, 217)

(8 sections, 288 words, 1254 letters)



CHAPTER 34

DEACONS

1. In every city shall ye ordain Deacons; lovers of the Law; men of stout heart, strong arm, and swift foot: men who neither despise the poor, nor fear the rich; kind, persevering, and just; seeking unto the Kingdom of God and its righteousness. (43, 189)

2. The Deacons shall be Ministers unto the King, the Judges, and the Elders, to execute their Commandments, both in judgment and mercy: they shall be merciful and just. (28, 132)

3. The Deacons shall be Stewards and keepers of the King's prisons: and Stewards of the King's Courts. (17, 79)

4. In the cities, and towns, and prisons, shall Chiefs be appointed over them: but one of the King's Counsellors shall be their Grand Master. (24, 109)

(4 sections, 112 words, 509 letters)



CHAPTER 35

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE LAW

1. Fear not, little flock, for your Father, in his good pleasure, hath given you the Kingdom; the dominion is yours forever; ye shall smite the nations with a continual stroke; for the Lord your God hath spoken it: ye shall break them in pieces, and destroy them; for the day of his vengeance has come. (55, 234)

2. He hath judged the nations that are near, and decreed destruction upon them, and their day continueth not: the nations far away are covered with their abominations as with a garment: their iniquities are not hid: he will not spare them. (41, 190)

3. The Saints of the former days have sat in judgment upon them; they have judged the earth, and the nations thereof shall not be spared: fire goeth before: famine followeth after; and the pestilence shall waste them. (37, 172)

4. Arise and smite them, O Daughter of Zion; and thou, O Tower of the Flock, whose power is above the clouds, possess thy dominion, and be thou a refuge: for Judah shall be bent, in his strength; as an arrow, Ephraim shall fill him: Manasseh shall be his barb; and Jacob shall be in the midst of the Gentiles, in the empire of nations, as a Lion among the beasts of the forest; as a young Lion in the flocks of sheep, who, when he goeth through, treadeth down and teareth in pieces, and none shall deliver. (97, 387)

5. Let your fear be upon all men; and the terrour of you upon your enemies; for this is the day of vengeance of the Lord, and of your recompense upon your enemies. Joseph shall possess his land again; for the throne of David is established as the days of the sun; his Kingdom is everlasting. (55, 227)

6. And now, O Daughter of Zion, the land of robbers, the empire of many nations, shall gather her troops against thee, to look upon thee, and to defile thy dominion: but they have not known the thought of the Lord; neither have they understood his counsel; for he shall gather them as sheaves of the floor. (56, 238)

7. Arise and thrash, for I will make thy power iron: the tread of thy foot shall crush: thou shalt break in pieces many people, and shalt consecrate their spoil unto God, and their dominion to the Lord of the whole earth. (41, 172)

8. Babylon the Great shall perish before thee; for thou shalt do unto her as she hath done unto thee: thou shalt render unto her as she hath rendered to thee, and reward her double for all her sins. Her cities shall be given to the flames, and the inhabitants to the sword: her government shall be broken in pieces, and her dominion taken away. (64, 270)

9. For in her is found the blood of Saints and Prophets; and the spoil of the children of God in the midst of her: and she hath drank of the cup of the indignation, and of the fury of God, with all the nations of the Gentiles. (47, 172)

10. Against her, Apostles have washed their feet on earth, and borne witness in heaven; and by the testimony and the blood of Prophets have her sins been made known in heaven: the great Prince, whose throne is as burning fire, hath judged her, saying, Let not her days be prolonged. (50, 220)

11. For by this Law shall men be judged in the portion of Joseph: God will give it to you, that you may possess it for an everlasting dominion. In the midst of the Gentiles shall ye establish your Synagogues, and gather out the just while ye wait for the judgments of God. (52, 212)

12. Ye shall, therefore, read in it all the days of your lives. Ye shall read it in your solemn assemblies, and in your joyous meetings; with the shout of triumph when your enemies flee before you; and in the voice of mourning when you have sinned against God, and have fled before them; ye shall read it in the gathering of your neighbours, and in the household with your children. (70, 299)

13. Ye shall talk of it in the house, and in the field, and by the wayside, and in the forest, and on the waters; in the camp, and on the march: when ye labour, and when ye rest shall ye speak of this Law to your neighbours, and to your wives, and to your children, and to your servants. (59, 213)

14. And ye shall think upon it in your joy, and in your sorrow; when upon the land which the Lord your God giveth you, and when far away; both in the midst of the multitude, and in your loneliness; all the days of your lives shall ye read it, and talk of it, and think upon it; and it shall be inscribed upon your hearts continually. (66, 254)

15. For by this Law hath the Lord your God sanctified you, and given you judgment, and justice, and dominion. Remember that ye stood before him; your King, and your Princes, and your Nobles, the men of you, with your wives and your children, and your little ones, and entered into covenant with the Lord your God, to be a people unto him, and to obey his Commandments, and to keep this Law; and that he covenanted with you to be your God, and to make you a nation of Kings and Priests to the nations of the earth. (98, 395)

16. Keep, therefore, this Law, and obey these Commandments; for so doth God sanctify you, and so will he establish you, and prosper you, more abundantly than in former days. The land of Joseph shall ye possess forever, and Israel and Judah shall dwell again upon their own mountains. (48, 222)

17. Your vineyards, your gardens, and your orchards, ye shall plant again, and they shall flourish, and ye shall eat the fruit thereof: ye shall build houses, and shall inhabit them; and children's children shall be in them, for a crown of glory to you, if ye remember the Lord your God, whose name is great and glorious, and keep his statutes. (61, 266)

18. And now if there be among you a man whose heart turneth away from the Lord your God, to serve the god of Babylon, and to honour the names of the nations; if there be a root that beareth gall and wormwood; and when he heareth the curse in this Law, he bless himself, saying, I shall have peace, though I walk in the imagination of my heart, the Lord will not spare him. (74, 285)

19. But the anger of the Lord, and his jealousy, and his fierce wrath, shall smoke against that man: and all the curses that are written in this book shall be upon him, and the Lord shall blot out his name from under heaven. (43, 172)

20. At the end of every seven years, in the solemnity of the year, when all the children of the Kingdom are gathered together before the Lord in Temples, and in Tabernacles, and all the people are assembled, Princes and Nobles, men, and women, and children, and the stranger that dwelleth in your gates, ye shall read this Law before them all, in their hearing, and shall make it known in the midst of them. (74, 317)

21. And your children, and the strangers dwelling in your gates, that have not heard it, shall learn this Law, and ye shall all remember it again, and shall all lift up your hands, and shall enter into covenant with the Lord your God to keep this Law, and to obey his statutes, that he may prolong your days upon the land. (61, 249)

(21 sections, 1249 words, 5166 letters)



CHAPTER 36

PRIESTHOOD

1. There are two Priesthoods: the Priesthood of an endless life; and the Priesthood of life. (15, 72)

2. In the Priesthood of an endless life are two Orders; that of Apostles, and of Priests. (16, 68)

3. Of Apostles there are four Degrees. (6, 29)

4. The first Degree is that of Lawgiver, and is Apostle, Prophet, Seer, Revelator and Translator. This Degree is sole, and gives the word of God as from his own mouth. (30, 128)

5. The second Degree is that of Counsellor, and is Apostle, Prophet, Seer and King. (14, 63)

6. The third Degree is that of Embassador. Of these there shall be twelve. They shall be Apostles and witnesses to the nations, and Rulers in all places where the Lawgiver shall send them. (33, 149)

7. The fourth Degree is that of Evangelist. Evangelists are Apostles, and witnesses of the Kingdom, to whatever nation they are sent. Seven are a full Quorum; and there shall be but one Quorum to any nation, kindred, tongue or people. (40, 184)

8. Of Priests there are two Degrees. (6, 27)

9. The first Degree is that of High Priests. (8, 33)

10. The second Degree is that of Elders. (7, 29)

11. In the Priesthood of life are three Orders; that of Priest, of Teacher, and of Deacon. (16, 67)

12. Of Priests, of the Priesthood of life, there shall be a Chief Priest, a first and second High Priest, and a Leader of each Course of Priests, to every Temple. (30, 123)

13. This Priesthood shall be divided into Courses, according to the nature of their duties; and officers appointed in the several Courses, to guide and direct in the duties of the Course. In organizing the Courses, those may be included who have been ordained to a higher Priesthood. (47, 227)

14. Of Teachers there are five Degrees; Rabboni, Rabbi, Doctor, Ruler, and Teacher. (12, 62)

15. Of Deacons there are three Degrees; Marshals, Stewards, and Ministers. (10, 57)

(15 sections, 290 words, 1318 letters)

The 6th Step

This has to do with the leader of the church. This is also called the Terrestial kingdom or order. It for this reason that the 6th step over and 3 steps up to the patriarchal order is the patriarch over the church.

This principle also applies to the 1st order which is the Davcitcal priesthood and of a political nature.  The picture above shows how the 6th step going up has to do with the administration of the terrestial kingdom. In this case, it's government is based on the terrestiual law. This  law is based on Love your neighbor as yourself. The organization and officers enforcing this law is explained in part in the LDS Doctrine and Covenants Section 20:

 38 The duty of the elders, priests, teachers, deacons, and members of the church of Christ—An apostle is an elder, and it is his calling to baptize;

 39 And to ordain other elders, priests, teachers, and deacons;

 40 And to administer bread and wine—the emblems of the flesh and blood of Christ—

 41 And to confirm those who are baptized into the church, by the laying on of hands for the baptism of fire and the Holy Ghost, according to the scriptures;

 42 And to teach, expound, exhort, baptize, and watch over the church;

 43 And to confirm the church by the laying on of the hands, and the giving of the Holy Ghost;

 44 And to take the lead of all meetings.

 45 The elders are to conduct the meetings as they are led by the Holy Ghost, according to the commandments and revelations of God.

 46 The priest’s duty is to preach, teach, expound, exhort, and baptize, and administer the sacrament,

 47 And visit the house of each member, and exhort them to pray vocally and in secret and attend to all family duties.

 48 And he may also ordain other priests, teachers, and deacons.

 49 And he is to take the lead of meetings when there is no elder present;

 50 But when there is an elder present, he is only to preach, teach, expound, exhort, and baptize,

 51 And visit the house of each member, exhorting them to pray vocally and in secret and attend to all family duties.

 52 In all these duties the priest is to assist the elder if occasion requires.

 53 The teacher’s duty is to watch over the church always, and be with and strengthen them;

 54 And see that there is no iniquity in the church, neither hardness with each other, neither lying, backbiting, nor evil speaking;

 55 And see that the church meet together often, and also see that all the members do their duty.

 56 And he is to take the lead of meetings in the absence of the elder or priest—

 57 And is to be assisted always, in all his duties in the church, by the deacons, if occasion requires.

 58 But neither teachers nor deacons have authority to baptize, administer the sacrament, or lay on hands;

 59 They are, however, to warn, expound, exhort, and teach, and invite all to come unto Christ.

An alternative organization and methods for enforcing this law is also explained in the Mentinah Archives:

The Mentinah Archives
Volume One thru Nine
(As of Jan. 12, 2011)
The Nemenhah
page 97


Chapter Sixteen
1.
Now behold, from time to time, the People of Ammon did meet together to
counsel one with another, to plan and prepare for the coming activities, and to
hear the complaints of the people, or to hear and judge crimes. And this is the
manner in which they did govern all their affairs:
2.
Yea, in the cities they had no judges or courts, but they elected a council of
thirteen individuals. And one of them was elected by the council to preside over
the council and had voice in the council but had no vote.
3.
This council heard all grievances which might arise among the people of the
city. And behold, they also took counsel together to determine the needs of the
community, whether more corn was needed or more fish, or more stone, and so
forth.
4.
Now behold, the councils of the Ammonites were made up of men and
women whom the mothers of the community nominated. Wherefore, whenever a
council was to be elected, all the mothers of the community met together and
brought forth the names of those men and women most suited for the councils.
And if the city were great, it was divided into several communities for the
purpose of elections.
5.
And when the mothers had brought forth the names of those most suitable,
all the people voted on those names and the thirteen who received the most votes
were invited to sit as the Council of the Community for one year. Now, the
mothers brought forth the names and from them the people elected their leaders
by vote, each person of the age of agency having one vote. And behold, the
councils were made up of men and women nominated by the mothers of the
community.
6.
And now, each community council sent one or two of their numbers up to
serve, from time to time, in larger councils, and thus did the People of Ammon
choose to govern and regulate their affairs.
7.
And behold, the people generally enjoyed peace. But behold, when there
did arise contention, the matter was brought before the community council to be
heard of them. And when all sides of the matter had been heard, the council
passed judgment and the matter was ended and the contention was resolved. And
thus great equity was had among the people of Ammon.
8.
Behold, this manner of governance served to unite the Ammonites and also
to discourage evil men from gaining power among them. Yea, and it was
preferable to them, more so than the system of lesser and greater judges as was
had among the Nephites.
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Page 323
12. Yea, we did debate these things for a long time and the Council did finally
come to a decision with the help of the Spirit of God in us. Verily, it was decided
that each person ought to be the steward of all that the Lord does see fit to
bestow. Yea, and each person should labor to have a surplus, but also to be the
steward of that surplus, remaining ever watchful that when the needy come for
assistance that he give what assistance he may. And when there is a surplus for
which special needs exist, then that surplus ought to be given to the storehouse.
13. But behold, no one is to judge another for their substance or their offerings.
And in this thing, the Council deemed that there would be much greater peace in
the communities and in all the land.
14. And again, from time to time, there arose disputations because that one
person or another failed to live the Law of Consecration as another thought it
ought to be lived. These were kept to a minimum because of the constant
teaching of the principles and ordinances of the High Place. And indeed, it was
difficult to imagine much contention about such things. For, the people were in
such accord that there was seldom much disagreement.
15. But now and then there arises someone in the community that refuses to
labor for their own support, but becomes dependent upon the labors of their
neighbors and take advantage of them. Now, these are not they who are sick or
halt or blind or in any way are unable to labor. But they are they who see how
easy it might become to live upon the labors of others. These are always brought
before the Community Council and chastened. And if they do repent and take up
again some useful purpose, all is forgotten. But if they refuse, or they repent the
moment and return to their sloth, they are brought once again before the Council
and they are chastened.
16. And if the person repents not and does refuse to return to some useful
purpose, then assistance to them is curtailed. They must rely upon the charity of
their neighbors. And, if it so be that they have taken such advantage of their
neighbors that there exists bad will between them, they do usually move away
from them. Then they are treated as neighbors and all the people trade with them,
for, in trade we do assume that they have become once again fruitful, wherefore
we do trade with them. But they no longer receive of the surplus.
17. Now, this may seem harsh, but, how may one live solely off the labor of
another if he be of good body and right mind? And if he be of sound body and
his mind is right, how should he feel to live off the labors of another? Wherefore,
let all they who live the Law of Consecration do so with all their heart, for it does
establish a Zion on earth. But let him not take the advantage of his neighbor.
18. Wherefore, our communities grew very rapidly, for there were many people
who came into the land to live in peace and harmony with us and learning our
ways, desired to be Nemenhah. And as many as did strive for the things that we
did strive for were admitted into our communities, and they become one with us.
19. And from time to time there arise those who do commit grave sin against a
neighbor, such that they do take away a person‟s ability to labor. These are
immediately brought before the Community Council to be examined of them.
And if the thing be proved with witnesses, that the matter be accidental and
without malice or intention, then that person is given the opportunity to make the
matter good, if it is possible, pledging for the upkeep of the injured person. And
if the burden be not deemed too great, the matter stands corrected, insofar as such
things can be corrected. And if it be deemed that the burden be too great, then the
sinner is reproved and is assigned to do all that is not too great a burden for the
upkeep of the injured one.
20. If it is found that the matter be intentional and with malice and the
malefactor be not repentant and will refuse to pledge for the upkeep of the
injured, that person is hastily cast out into the lonely world and a decree
advertising the abuse is published in all the land. And that decree shall stand
until the person desires to repent and make good his offense.
21. And behold, if it be found that a person does willfully do an act of murder,
rapine or mayhem and it is proven with witnesses and evidence that the act was
of no accident and was verily done with intention, then that person is speedily
and privily put to death. Behold, this is our law, that any act of murder, rapine or
mayhem shall be dealt with in this harsh manner. For, we have seen the
destruction of a people because of the secret combinations of the Gadiantonhem
and we wish no such thing to take hold among our people.
22. But behold, according to the records and remembrances of the people, there
has only been two such cases and they involved persons who had come among
our people from afar off and had no knowledge of our ways. Yea, they were
foreigners from foreign lands where such things are common, but they were not
of us.
23. For behold, we do esteem each one of us equally responsible for the
upholding of the laws which have been established by the councils. Likewise, we
do esteem each other equally entitled to the benefit that good laws do bring to a
people.
24. Wherefore, if a man steals from his neighbor, he is chastened and must
return the thing stolen. And if the stolen article is destroyed or consumed, then
he is chastened and must return the value of the thing. When this is done, the
matter stands resolved. But if the man steals again or makes a habit of theft, even
though it deprive no one of the ability to labor for his upkeep, such that he steals
three times, he is cast out from among the people and is no longer entitled to the
surplus. But, if he repent and prove himself through diligent service for the space
of one year, then is he re-admitted in full fellowship.
25. But behold, if he return again to his crimes, he is forthwith cast out from
among the people and a decree is sent out to all the people of his crimes.
26. And if a man bear false witness against his neighbor such that he be injured
in his good name or his reputation and it be proved with witnesses and evidences,
then is the offender brought before the Community Council and the matter is
heard. And if the matter be proven, then the man is chastened and, in order to
remain in the community, he must make amends for his error and labor to repair
the damage he has caused by his false witness. But behold, he is not made to
pledge himself for the upkeep of the offended person, for he has not caused the
offended to lose the ability to provide for his own family and for the community.
But the offender must repent and make amends, else he is cast out from among
the people.
27. Behold, in Mentinah, it is sin to do injury or harm unto your neighbor, for,
we hold that our way of life depends upon one neighbor serving another. Yea,
we labor diligently not only for our own living, but also for the upkeep and
happiness of our neighbors. And, if there be any who feel not to participate with
us in our ways and our customs, behold, there is none that stands to compel them,
but they are welcome to depart and live as they want to.
28. Yea, and it is true that we are prospered by the Lord in measure greater than
that which is enjoyed by the people in the Land Southward. For, were it not so, I
can hardly think that so many would come unto us and beg us to admit them into
our society. And we do live happily with all people because of our laws, for, we
know what is expected of us and we do serve each other.

Page 348
8.
And we do not raise up unto ourselves Kings or Queens to rule over us, but
we are Priests and Kings, Priestesses and Queens unto the most high God.
Wherefore, what need have we of such rulers in the land, when every man and
every woman of the Nemenhah may make such claim? And if we are all Priests
and Kings, how may there be any beggar among us? For, what royal would see
his near kinsman suffer for want of food or drink? And what King would suffer
his kin to sit in the gutter and beg for a scrap to wear?

Page 429
44. Now, because of durable covenants, which we deem very desirable, our
laws have become consistent with that which is necessary to make them durable
in Christ. For, we know that we are sometimes strong of heart but frail in action.
Wherefore, to make natural laws that assist us in keeping the heavenly laws is a
sound practice.
45. And the laws of Mentinah are founded upon that which our fathers taught us
from the records and also they also arise out of the words of Christ spoken to our
grandfathers. And these are the laws of our people:
46. If men or women do any sort of violence against their neighbor, without
provocation and not in their own defense, they shall have no place in the
communities of the Nemenhah. They are cast out from among the people.
47. And, if such violence causes the death of another, the malefactor is taken
outside the city and is stoned until dead.
48. But, if the injury of another is caused by men or women, and there be
provocation, the case is carefully considered by the Council and restitution is
determined. And when the restitution is accomplished, let the parties forgive
each other and live in peace.
49. And if the violence causes death, but is by provocation, the case is not of
murder but is manslaughter and it is carefully considered by the Council and
restitution is determined. And, if need be, the malefactor is sent away to another
city to live in refuge. And when the restitution is accomplished, let the parties
forgive each other and live in peace. But let the offender live in another city.
50. But behold, any man who violates a woman or a child, and proofs be
provided, he is taken outside the wall and stoned to death. And any man who
does violence of any kind to any woman or child, is taken outside the wall and
stoned to death. For, man is the stronger vessel. Wherefore, let him take care in
all his dealings with women and children.
51. And if men and women steal from any person, the theft is considered
carefully before the Council and restitution is determined. And if they will make
no restitution, they are cast out. But, if the malefactor returns that which has been
stolen, and when the restitution is accomplished, let the parties forgive each other
and live in peace.
52. And if men and women destroy any thing that is the stewardship of another,
let them make restitution. If they will make no restitution, let them be cast out.
And when the restitution is accomplished, let the parties forgive each other and
live in peace.
53. And if men and women bind themselves together in a holy state of
matrimony, let them be faithful one to another. And if they be found in adultery,
let them be cast out, and the children shall remain with the faithful party. And if
both mother and father be unfaithful, let the children be adopted unto the faithful.
For, it is not good for children to be raised up among adulterers.
43054. Men and women shall not bind themselves for convenience. For, this union
is one of fornication and lust and shall undermine the community. Let men and
women bind themselves with a durable covenant.
55. And any man who shall make fornication with a child, but with the consent
of the child, shall be taken outside the wall and stoned to death. And the child
shall be taken aside and counseled diligently.
56. And any woman who shall make fornication with a child, but with the
consent of the child, shall be taken outside the wall and stoned to death. And the
child shall be taken aside and counseled diligently.
57. And when children do fornicate with a man or a woman, or with another
child, they shall be taken aside and counseled diligently, that they might
understand the gravity of their misconduct. But they are not punished, for they
are children. However, let also their parents be taken aside and judged. For they
have failed in their duty to teach their children. Wherefore, it might needs be that
the children ought to be raised by another. But let this be decided by the Council,
for there are mitigating circumstances in such cases.
58. And the foreigner in the land shall be treated in all things as any citizen.
There is no distinction of laws concerning the sojourner. But if the sojourner
makes mischief without knowledge of the law, the case shall be judged by the
Council and the sojourner is treated accordingly. But, in the case of murder or
violation of women and children, the case shall be judged the same as for any
citizen.
59. Now, there has not been any case of a man violating a man, but such things
might occur. When such is the case, and proofs are provided, the malefactor is
taken outside the wall and stoned to death.
60. And behold, there have been some few cases of unnatural lust and of the
fornication that comes of it, but this has been mainly among sojourners.
Nevertheless, when men make fornication with one another, they are not cast out
from among the communities of the Nemenhah but are counseled not to marry.
Likewise, when women make fornication with women, they are not cast out from
among the communities, but they are counseled not to marry. And, no
stewardship can be given them, but they are left to work for another to earn their
bread. And this is done in order to encourage them to leave the community of
their own accord. For, can a community be built or stand upon fornication?
61. Such men and women ought to be taken aside and counseled diligently to
repent. For, their acting out might lead to greater injury that might take away
their lives. And such men and women are not numbered in the counting of the
families of the community.
43162. But let no violence come to them, for they may be able to repent. And, if
they repent, they may yet be numbered among the families.
63. And, if men and women have a stewardship that is able to make mischief
upon the stewardship of another, such as with livestock, and their stewardship
does make mischief upon the stewardship of another, be it livestock or durable
goods, and they make no natural restitution, the matter is taken up by the Council
and restitution is determined. And, if that person dishonors the Council, the case
is the same as willful injury. Let that person be cast out and the stewardship of
that person be given to the injured party. But if, by natural restitution, or by that
determined by the Council, restitution is made, let that be the end of the matter.
For, what more can a person do than to restore that which has been lost. And
when the restitution is accomplished, let the parties forgive each other and live in
peace.
64. But behold, if such injury becomes a pattern of negligence by a particular
steward, the stewardship is not fitting and ought to be given unto another. Let
that person be trained in another stewardship before worse things take place.
65. And when the stewardship of men or women does cause the death of any
person, and it be by accident established by proofs, there shall be no restitution.
For, the death is by accident. But, if the death does arise out of a pattern of
negligence, then the matter is one of manslaughter and must be treated as such.
66. And when the stewardship of men or women does cause injury to any
person, and it be by accident established by proofs, there shall be no restitution.
For the injury is by accident. But, if the injury does arise out of a pattern of
negligence, then the matter is one of unprovoked injury and must be treated as
such.
67. Now, sometimes injury and death does occur out of the provoked action of
another, although this has only taken place thrice in the history of Mentinah.
When the injury or death occurs from provocation, the matter is carefully
considered by the Council. And the decision of the Council stands in such
matters.
68. For, the injury may be to the individual, but the provocation is also injury to
the entire community. Wherefore, let the community take it up as a case of
common good and determine the outcome. In such cases, let the general
assembly condone the action of the Council, or let the Council continue to
consider the case. And when the restitution is accomplished, let the parties
forgive each other and live in peace.
69. In all these laws, the Nemenhah have relied upon the Ten Commandments
as our guides, and also the words of Christ. For, we would have no lawlessness
432in our communities. But we would also wish to be acceptable before Christ.
Wherefore, we make laws wherein restitution and forgiveness are possible.
70. And behold, we do hold to the Ten Commandments given unto our Father
Moses. And if there be any who is found guilty by proofs of injuring another
because of their breach of the Ten Commandments, they are held accountable
under our law and are treated accordingly.
71. But, if there be any who are found guilty by proofs of breach of the Ten
Commandments, or any of the Commandments of God, but causes no injury, they
are taken aside and diligently counseled to repent. For if they repent, they are
made better citizens and stewards. Yea, Christ may make of their adversity a
great strength.
72. Yea, we who call ourselves Nemenhah, do so because we honor and
worship God. And, though we take pride in the workmanship of our hands, we
do not worship statues and images. Nor do not we worship any work of our own
hands. Our temples and our synagogues, our lodges and our churches are
beautifully built, but they are not great and spacious, but only sufficient for our
needs. And the place where our councils meet is a small, round place, suitable
for the members to sit comfortably and that is all.
73. We give no homage to the fields and the flocks and we assign no deity to
govern there over Him who gave them. We raise up no oblation to any but They
who are real and personal.
74. God, who is the Father of our Spirits, we do worship. And we raise up our
prayers unto Him. As also God, who is the Mother of our Spirits, we do worship.
As also God, who is the Creator and Atoner, we do worship. And behold, we do
worship Them by and through the Power of the Holy Ghost.
75. Now, These are real and personal beings, not being manifestations of the
same being, but all are separate individuals. Wherefore, They are not idols and
there is no vanity in Them. Neither is there vanity in us when we do raise up our
voices and our hands to worship Them. For, They are truly unified in all things,
and we do unify ourselves in worshiping Them.
76. We do greatly honor other heavenly beings. Nevertheless, we do not
worship them. Yea, because of the truth upon which we are founded, we do
entertain Angels and the Spirits of Just Men and Women made perfect. And
behold, we are constantly instructed by them. But behold, our worship is of They
unto whom we look for life, renewal and eventual perfection.
77. We are careful to give due honor unto our parents, according to our
customs. For, we do recognize that without them we would have no place in the
land. And behold, if there be any who do dishonor their mother or their father,
433they are taken aside privily and counseled diligently to repent. And, if they
repent not, they are brought before the Council. And, when their sin is made
manifest before the Council, and they repent not, they are removed from all
stewardship and sent away into a different city. And behold, if they continue in
their sin, dishonoring their parents still, even though they reside in a different
place, then are they cast out from among the people.
78. For, to dishonor a parent is to dishonor the community, and what manner of
man shall rely upon his neighbor as we do and yet dishonor his nearest neighbor?
Shall such a community that is based in dishonor prosper? Not so long as the
Lord has spoken against it. For, against such a community shall the Lord also
speak.
79. And the Nemenhah strive to deal honestly with all people. Wherefore, if a
man or woman is found in a lie, they are taken aside privily and counseled
diligently to repent. And, if they repent, the matter is closed. Howbeit they
repent not, they are also brought up before the Council.
80. And, if the lie has made injury upon another, they are judged according as
has already been spoken. But, if the lie has injured no one, they are counseled to
repent again, yea, even publicly. And, if they repent not, all stewardship is taken
from them. Nevertheless, they are not cast out, but must make their living by
laboring for another.
81. And behold, because we have all things in common, to labor for another is
very hard. Wherefore, the liar is made to feel the weight of their sin. And in this
way, they are induced to leave the community, for their wish is to live differently
than the Nemenhah.
82. Behold, the Nemenhah are also people of the Sabbath. Yea, we do give six
days in which to labor for our good, but one day we do dedicate unto labor for the
Lord.
83. And behold, we are careful in our use of words of invective and we do
always try to maintain constraint and dignity in our communication one with
another. We do not foreswear ourselves and we do not use foul and loathsome
language.
84. We do not use the Lord‟s name in vain, for we know the penalty that the
Lord exacts upon they who foreswear themselves by oaths, inciting the very
name of God to seal their oaths, but do so in vanity. Yea, we do take upon
ourselves the name of Christ, but we do it not in vain and we require it not of
anyone. For to do so is to bring guilt upon our heads that even the Lord cannot
take away.
43485. Now, among the Nemenhah, we have not been troubled with covetousness,
because that we have all things in common. And this is a great blessing unto us,
for, to covet the belongings of ones neighbor in any of the cities and villages of
the Nemenhah is to covet their need or their want. And all the needs and wants of
the people are alike provided by the people. Wherefore, wherein may anyone
covet? But behold, we teach against pride and against greed. For, such things
would prove the breakdown and the destruction of all our blessings.
86. And we hold all sojourners to the same laws with which we do govern
ourselves, after that we have taken them aside and instructed them in the laws of
our land. And after that the sojourner has learned of our laws and our ways, if
they do break the law, then they are dealt with the same as any Nemenhah.
Behold, we hold this to be equitable.
87. Now, in the experience of our people, because we have founded ourselves
upon these simple precepts, we find that we do not need a larger body of law.
For, when there are complaints or offenses of lesser nature, we do insist that the
parties settle the matter between themselves privily. And this is wisdom. For,
every matter of lesser import ought to be settled in this manner, to preserve peace
between neighbors.
88. And behold, needing no greater body of law, we find no need for bodies of
lawyers and legalists either. Wherefore, we prevent great evil in the land. For, as
is too evident in the Land Southward where their laws enlarge to the point of
being more populous than the people, a great body of men to interpret so great a
body of law is naturally necessitated. With such comes also the need for a
hierarchy of judges to judge the people, for every act does become in one way or
another against so great a volume of law.
89. And, because these men do labor all the day long in arguing the law, they
do not labor for the maintenance of the people nor of the community. Wherefore,
they must earn a wage and buy with money that which they need from they who
actually produce. This also necessitates the use of money and the storing up of
much provision to be sold for money.
90. And behold, in this there is great iniquity and great danger to the
community. For behold, great stores of stuff of value brings about the building of
riches and of pride. And it is easy to become covetous of the few who have the
stewardship of so much. And it is easy to use such stores of stuff to buy up
lawyers and judges to one‟s own purposes. Yea, and this is the downfall of all
and the eventual ruin of Zion.
91. Wherefore, because we do constrain our body of law to that which the Lord
has given, we have no need of great bodies of lawyers and judges, a great
blessing to us.
43592. And also, we do teach and diligently instruct our children in all of our laws
in order that they might be competent to make settlement of their small concerns
one with another and cause no greater matter to come before the Councils.
93. Behold, this is our law, our custom and our way.
Chapter Two
1.
Now, it is certain that the Nemenhah had continual peace in the land during
the years of my stewardship as clerk to the High Priests of Mentinah. But, that is
not to say that there were no strifes or difficulties. It is only to say that we did not
go up to war in my days, for there were no real enemies in the land.
2.
Notwithstanding, there was strife from time to time and this did usually
concern interpretation of the law. For behold, it is as I have written, and also as
others have written, that we had no lawyers. Nor did any man or woman speak
for another in all the land, but, when there were disputations, each person did
stand for themselves before the councils of the Nemenhah. And behold, the
resolution of the dispute was made by thorough examination of evidence and
testimony. And, when a council had decided the matter, their decision was taken
as a resolution of it.
3.
But, on occasion, one party or another has disagreed with the decision of the
council. As often as this has taken place, and it has not been very often, the
matter is taken to the general assembly, all evidence and testimony is read before
the people of the city and they are asked to decide the matter.
4.
This is a last resort and is only employed when the parties of a dispute will
not uphold the decision reached in council. In this instance, the dispute becomes
a new injury, one to the community as a whole, and is taken up by the people in
assembly. It is not a rehearsing of the original dispute, but rather, it is a new
case.
5.
For, our laws provide a means by which the disinterested may assist in
resolving issues in which the parties have interest. And it is by this means that
strife and abuses are prevented in the resolution of such disputes. But, when the
dispute rises above such disinterest and the parties begin to pile abuse upon the
council for its service in the matter, then the injury is to the entire community and
all have interest. Wherefore, the very last council, and last resort, is the
community at large.
6.
Once the community and general assembly has heard all there is to say
about a thing, then a vote is taken and the decision of the community stands. If
the parties continue in their strife, they are cast out from among the people. If
they repent of their strife and forgive each other, then they may continue in the
community and peace prevails.